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Democrats win the senate after Georgia runoff election

By Natalie Faas, News Editor


After the November election, one state was left with an election that was too close to call— the Georgia Senate race between Senator Raphael Warnock and Republican candidate and former football player, Herschel Walker.


On Tuesday night, media outlets announced Warnock’s victory, which secured a 51-49 Democratic majority in the senate. According to the New York Times, “The implications for Senate Democrats and the Biden administration extend well beyond the single Senate slot. With an additional vote, Democrats can take much more operational control of the Senate, easing the confirmation of contentious nominees, clearing the way for investigations and availing themselves of breathing room on a variety of matters.”


This win was pivotal to Democrats who want to continue moving their agenda through Congress. Even though they lost the house majority to Republicans, losing ten seats, this win in the Senate will allow them to move more legislation through and block a Republican-dominated House. The Democratic-feared red wave did not happen in the way most experts predicted.


The New York Times also mentioned that “an enlarged majority dilutes the influence of individual senators such as Joe Manchin III, Democrat of West Virginia, who has used his swing-vote status to exert effective veto power over legislation, helping to derail some of the main elements of Mr. Biden’s agenda and significantly shaping those that have been achieved.” With Warnock’s win on Tuesday night, Democrats can feel more secure in their position going into 2023.


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